Audit focus for schools in fiscal year 2016

Pupil writing on the board at elementary school maths classSchool districts have asked the State Auditor’s Office to let them know in advance the areas they can expect auditors to emphasize in upcoming audits. This list will help your district prepare for audits examining FY 2016. If you have questions, your local audit team is available year round: they can answer technical questions and point you to additional guidance on specific areas of audit.  Continue reading

Performance audit findings on boards that conduct hearings on medical mistakes

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Doctors sometimes make mistakes, and those mistakes can have life-or-death consequences for patients. Washington, like every other state, uses boards to license and regulate doctors and other healthcare providers, and can impose discipline on providers.

The Washington State Auditor’s Office recently released a performance audit that looked at two of these boards. The Medical Quality Assurance Commission (MQAC) is one of the largest, regulating 31,000 medical doctors and physician assistants. The Board of Osteopathic Medicine and Surgery (BOMS) is one of the smallest, regulating about 1,800 osteopathic doctors and physician assistants, but was included because medical and osteopathic doctors often do the same work in the same settings. Continue reading

Performance audit highlights ways governments can reduce printing costs

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Large-scale printing

Information can be transmitted, shared and read electronically around the world almost instantaneously. However, even as information has become increasingly digital, printed materials still play an important role in business and government operations. The Washington State Auditor’s Office published an audit October 31, 2016, that focused on the state’s printing services. The audit followed up on a 2011 audit that made recommendations to reduce the state’s printing costs. While the audit focused on the state’s centralized printing services provider, Printing & Imaging (P&I) within the Department of Enterprise Services (DES), its findings and recommendations may also be helpful to many other governments as they try to minimize spending. Continue reading

Survey shows states are concerned about cyber security, and making progress

Hacking Bypass Security

The National Association of State Chief Information Officers (NASCIO) conducts an annual survey of state Chief Information Officers to learn about the top policy and technology issues state governments face. State Chief Information Officers (CIOs) have ranked cyber security as the top priority on every survey since 2014. At the State Auditor’s Office, we are also concerned about cyber security. To help state agencies and local governments protect their IT systems and data, we conduct IT security performance audits designed to assess opportunities for improvement. We plan to continue these audits to strengthen the security posture of our state and local governments.

In 2016, the Deloitte-NASCIO cyber security study was completed. This study surveyed states’ Chief Information Security Officers (CISOs) for their perspectives and insights cyber security issues. Interestingly, some of what the state CISOs reported in the survey aligned with what state agencies reported to our Office during our IT security performance audits. Specifically, they named adequate resources, including funding and staffing for IT security, as a significant challenge. However, the study’s results indicate CISOs and CIOs are having a strong, positive impact on cyber security, which is encouraging.