OPEB reporting update (GASB 45 to 75) serves as a reminder: Don’t forget about previous statements

Plenty of attention surrounds a new ReminderGovernmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) statement in the year it is implemented. Then we tend to forget about them in subsequent years. Not all GASB statements are relevant or material for all governments in the year they are implemented, but all governments should continue to monitor them.

A timely example is GASB Statement No. 45, Accounting and Financial Reporting by Employers for OPEB. When preparing for the 2018 implementation of GASB Statement No. 75, Accounting and Financial Reporting for Postemployment Benefits Other Than Pensions, which updates GASB 45, we asked questions such as “Who uses the State Actuary’s online tools for calculating OPEB liability under GASB 45?” and “How material are those governments’ Other Post-Employment Benefits (OPEB) liabilities?” Continue reading

Auditor McCarthy: Financial reporting should be easy to read and understand

Since the original issuance of Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement 34 in 1999, the Office of the Washington State Auditor has found the resulting financial statement presentations to be unnecessarily complex, less timely and more costly for state and local governments to prepare and have audited. These presentations are also more challenging to understand.

Financial statements prepared by state and local government entities in the United States are longer than those prepared by other organizations in the United States and around the world, due to the use of different accounting methods (e.g. modified-accrual and full-accrual) within the presentation.GASBlettergraphic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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GASB reporting model re-examination project

GASB_microphone_124632551.jpgThe Government Accounting Standards Board issued an invitation to comment on January 4 about potential changes to reporting of government funds, which GASB Chair Dave Vaudt recently described in a short video. The Board is seeking input on these ideas from local governments and other users during the preliminary stage of its project to re-evaluate the financial statement reporting model. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) for all state and local governments nationwide is set by GASB in accordance with an open, due process.

The State Auditor’s Office encourages local governments to follow the Board’s activities and provide input on potential accounting standards they will eventually need to follow.

(Stock photo)