Positive Pay can help protect your organization from check fraud

check_164491487Check fraud is a common financial crime here in Washington and nationwide. According to the American Bankers Association, check fraud accounted for 32 percent of the banking industry’s losses in 2015.

To help address this significant risk area as a preventative measure. While it was created to protect the banks, Positive Pay is a great tool that can be used by state and local governments to prevent and monitor for check fraud, common types of which include duplicated checks, altered check amounts and counterfeit checks.

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Repost from MRSC: Big Cybersecurity for Small Jurisdictions

From our friends at MRSC: Mike Kaser, IS Director for the City of Mercer Island, weighs in on protecting local governments from cyber attack. You can read the original here.

Big Cybersecurity for Small Jurisdictions

The use of technology to support service delivery by local government continues to grow. Whether it’s a 911 dispatcher, firefighter, patrol officer, utility crew member, or an elected official, all of these local government employees use technology as part of their everyday duties.

IT departments are expected to maintain operations with little to no downtime while cybersecurity incidents, like the recent global ransomware attack dubbed “WannaCry,” are one of many risks we face. Even the most sophisticated and well-funded organizations are finding their data unceremoniously dumped onto the Internet.

How can small jurisdictions with so few resources have a capable cybersecurity program in the face of today’s many risks? Simply put, determine what can be done within current resources and skill sets, then communicate honestly and openly with your organization’s leadership about where the gaps are. You must share and decentralize the risk beyond IT.

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Make sure to meet requirements when purchasing using ‘piggybacking’ method

“Piggybacking” refers to one local government making purchases from contracts awarded by another government or group of governments via an interlocal agreement or contract. Piggybacking is a convenient way to procure goods or services. However, our Office has seen an increasing number of local governments use this alternative method without completing the process properly. National purchasing cooperatives are becoming more widely used, and many of these are based in other states where the laws do not align with Washington law.

The key to maintaining compliance when procuring through piggybacking is to ensure your local government’s own bidding requirements are still met. State law
(RCW 39.34.030), which allows for piggybacking, does not relieve any public agency of any obligation or responsibility with respect to purchasing, except for the notice of bids or advertising requirements. As long as the lead agency satisfies its own requirements for advertising and posts the solicitation on the internet, the piggybacking government’s advertising requirements are considered met.

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Other post-employment benefits (OPEB) update

Diversity team in business development meeting with charts, IndiWe’re already halfway through 2017, and 2018 is quickly approaching! GASB Statement No. 75, Accounting and Financial Reporting for Postemployment Benefits Other Than Pensions, is effective for fiscal years ending in 2018.

Implementing this complex standard requires planning and information sharing. The State Auditor’s Office participates in several OPEB standards implementation workgroups to help identify and share common questions and concerns.

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GASB issues guidance on asset retirement obligations

The Government Accounting Standards Board (GASB) recently issued a new standard, GASB Statement 83, to provide accounting guidance on asset retirement obligations (AROs). The GASB issued this standard because many governments have not been reporting these liabilities or may have been applying other guidance (such as FAS 143). The standard is expected to resolve these inconsistencies and may result in some governments recording potentially significant liabilities.

The new standard is effective for financial statements on years ending after June 15, 2018, with early implementation encouraged. The pronouncement is available online at www.gasb.org.

If you have questions regarding ARO, please submit a HelpDesk request (login required). If you have questions about other GASB standards, please contact Debra.Burleson@sao.wa.gov.

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For 4th year in a row, more governments filing financial reports on time

Local governments are required to submit an annual financial report within 150 days after their fiscal year end under state law (RCW 43.09.230). Exhibit 1 illustrates that the number of governments meeting this requirement has increased for the fourth consecutive year. Exhibit 2 illustrates that 228 of the 302 governments that missed the filing deadline also missed the deadline in 2015.

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The State Auditor’s Office has emphasized the importance of filing timely annual reports and has provided assistance in a variety of ways. Most recently, we offered 27 free filing workshops statewide to help all local governments that were having difficulty meeting the requirement. Of the 350 governments that attended the workshops, 321 were able to file timely annual reports. This included 50 governments that did not meet the requirement last year.

We will continue to evaluate ways to increase the number of timely filings in the future. Please contact DuaneWalz@sao.wa.gov for questions or suggestions.